How to Outrank Your Competition’s Best-Performing Page

All is fair in love and SEO.

Ranking for a profitable keyword phrase can quickly become a dog fight, and the SEO battle between two rivals can get heated and ugly in a hurry.

Okay, maybe that’s overly dramatic, but you get the idea.

When you’re battling for search ranking supremacy, it can get dirty, and nothing is off limits.

You need to devise a winning strategy to not only outrank the competition but maintain your position.

One technique I’ve found to be incredibly effective for gaining the upper hand in the SEO battle is to identify your competition’s best-performing page and outrank it.

If they’re bringing in a large volume of leads ultimately resulting in conversions, you know you’ll be in good shape if you can usurp them.

HubSpot even found that “search traffic has the highest lead-to-customer conversion rate of all channels.”

image03

Dominate the search results, and reap the rewards.

But how exactly do you do this?

Here’s a step-by-step formula I’ve come up with.

1. Get their SEO stats

The first thing you’ll want to do is learn as much as possible about your competitor’s best-performing page.

For instance, you’ll want to find out:

  1. Where their backlinks are coming from
  2. The types of content they’re publishing
  3. Nofollow and dofollow links
  4. Titles
  5. H1, H2, and H3 tags
  6. Hyperlink anchors

How do you obtain this information?

I suggest using an SEO analysis tool such as Rank Tracker by SEO PowerSuite or Ahrefs.

You simply type in a site domain, and these tools will generate a wealth of helpful data you can use to thoroughly analyze the competition.

More specifically, they will provide answers to the first three factors I mentioned above: backlinks, types of content, and links.

As for the last three factors—titles, tags, and hyperlink anchors—check out their best-performing page to find this information directly.

2. Check for technical issues

Another thing I like about SEO PowerSuite is that they have a tool called “WebSite Auditor.”

This lets you quickly analyze any technical issues a particular page may have such as indexing or crawlability problems, coding glitches, and overall site structure.

Why is this important?

If you know for a fact there’s an obvious technical SEO issue and use this knowledge to your advantage, you stand a very good chance of outranking your competitor.

In other words, you’ll know what their weakness is. By ensuring that your site is free of these errors, you are giving yourself a good chance of eclipsing your competition in the search rankings.

Here’s what I’m talking about:

image00

Notice that this site has issues with crawlability and is lacking an XML sitemap.

After analyzing your competitor’s SEO stats and technical issues, you should have a pretty clear idea of what you’re up against.

More importantly, you’ll know precisely what you need to do in order to outrank them.

3. Do what your competition is doing—but better

I’ve talked about a concept known as the skyscraper technique before.

This is a term coined by Brian Dean from Backlinko. The technique is designed to dramatically boost your search traffic.

At its base level, this technique revolves around pinpointing a piece of link-worthy content a competitor has created, improving upon it, and connecting with influencers to promote it.

To take advantage of the skyscraper technique, you’ll first need to examine your competitor’s top backlinks.

Ask yourself which pieces of content appear to be having the biggest impact on their rankings.

Once it’s clear which specific pieces of content are boosting their SEO, you’ll want to create content that’s even better.

But how exactly do you go about this?

Next are a few techniques to help you achieve that goal.

4. Create more in-depth content

As you probably already know, I’m a proponent of long content.

Numerous studies have shown that content with a higher word count consistently outperforms content with a lower word count.

Here’s a graph that illustrates this perfectly:

image04

As you can see, the average word count for the number one spot in search rankings is 2,416.

Notice that it’s not 500, 750, or even 1,000 words. In order for content to rank highly, it needs to be well over 2,000 words.

Furthermore, you’re more likely to get more social shares by going this route:

image02

This graph clearly shows that content exceeding 1,500 words is far more likely to result in a higher number of social shares, especially on Twitter.

If the bulk of your competitor’s content is much shorter, simply creating longer, more in-depth content can put you well on your way to outranking them.

If you can create something epic on a particular topic, blowing competition’s mediocre content out of the water, this is definitely going to work to your advantage.

Just make sure you’re genuinely adding value and not merely eating up your word count.

5. Be visual-centric

I probably don’t need to tell you about the power of visual content, but I will anyway.

Since humans are inherently visual creatures, we’re more apt to respond to content with plenty of pictures, graphs, charts, etc. than to text-based content.

In fact, “content with relevant images gets 94 percent more views than content without relevant images.”

image06

If your competition is slacking on visuals, this presents a great opportunity for you.

Incorporating plenty of relevant images throughout your content will likely result in more traffic, more engagement, more shares, and, ultimately, a higher ranking within search results.

I also suggest experimenting with infographics.

This type of media has proven to be tremendously powerful and can optimize the user experience.

image01

If your competition is limiting itself to more traditional and, quite frankly, boring text-based content, presenting information through an infographic can most definitely give you an edge.

For more on how to create infographics, I recommend checking out this list of free infographic tools.

6. Make your content easier to digest

It’s also important to understand how the modern person reads digital content.

Hardly anyone reads an article in its entirety. They simply scan and check out a few key points that appeal most to them.

In order for your content to truly resonate, it needs to be scannable and snackable.

If you’re taking an old school approach, your content is likely to miss its mark.

But if it’s easily digestible, your content will have a maximum impact and could very well outperform your competition’s content.

Here are a few fundamental techniques for creating content with the modern reader in mind:

  • Use short paragraphs
  • Use plenty of H1, H2, and H3 headers
  • Use bullets to create lists

7. Outperform competitor from a technical standpoint

Remember when I talked about identifying technical issues on your competitor’s website?

The final step to this process is making sure that your website doesn’t have the same issues and glitches.

For example, maybe your competitor’s site is lacking an XML sitemap.

This is problematic because it makes it more difficult for search engine bots to crawl their site.

Simply taking the time to create an XML sitemap for your website will give you an advantage.

Just identify any technical issues your competitor’s site has, and ensure you’re not making the same mistakes.

Besides this, there are two more ways to outperform the competition.

8. Speed up your site

One is to make your site quicker than their site.

It’s been documented that Google takes into account a site’s load time when determining rankings.

And while it’s not as big of a factor as, say, backlinks, site speed definitely plays a role.

Not to mention that it will directly impact the user experience and the length of time visitors stay on your site.

In fact, a one-second delay can have an adverse impact on pageviews, customer satisfaction, and your overall conversion rate:

image05

Although I don’t have time to discuss all the details here, check out this article I wrote on how to make your site insanely fast.

9. Create content that’s more mobile-friendly than the competition’s

I’m sure you know just how big of a deal it is to be mobile-friendly in this day and age.

If Google’s “mobilegeddon” has taught us anything, it’s that we sure as heck had better be on board.

And if there’s anything less than a stellar user experience from a mobile perspective, we’ll be in trouble.

That’s why my final recommendation for outranking the competition is to make your content more mobile-friendly than theirs.

This all starts with using Google’s Mobile-Friendly Test if you haven’t done so already.

Within seconds, Google will let you know how your site is doing in this area and will provide suggestions on how to improve.

But I recommend taking it one step further and making it a point to create mobile-friendly content, which I cover in detail in this article.

This too can give you the necessary edge to surpass the competition.

Conclusion

Let’s recap.

To outdo your competition, you’ll want to check out their SEO stats and identify the content that’s providing them with the best backlinks.

From there, you’ll want to improve upon that content by using a few proven techniques.

Finally, it’s important to optimize your site from a technical standpoint.

By following this formula, you stand a good chance of outranking your competition’s best-performing page and ultimately cashing in on quality organic traffic.

Can you think of any other tactics that can help you beat the competition?  

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/09/how-to-outrank-your-competitions-best-performing-page/
via My Media Pal

How to Create a Content Marketing System That Runs on Autopilot

I think we can all agree that content marketing is both practical and potent.

It’s the ultimate form of inbound marketing and makes total sense when you need to reach 21st century consumers.

I could even spout off a laundry list of stats that prove just how big of an impact content marketing can have.

There’s the insane volume of leads, minimal financial investment, increased audience engagement, high ROI, and so on.

But if there’s any area where content marketers run into trouble, it’s the inherently time-consuming nature of the process.

Creating epic content takes time and energy. And not everyone has the time to devote to this marketing strategy.

And this doesn’t even include the additional effort needed to manage a campaign.

In many cases, it can take so much time that it hinders your ability to oversee other areas of business. Not good.

Here are some stats that put some perspective on just how time-consuming content marketing can be.

image00

If these trends continue, the time investment required for content marketing will keep growing and growing.

And of course you have to consider that competition levels will continue to rise as well.

With more brands catching wind of the potential of this technique, it will become increasingly difficult to make your campaign stand out from the masses, requiring even more of your time.

What’s the solution?

As a person who’s incredibly busy myself, I’ve figured out some effective ways to run a content marketing campaign that requires the least amount of time but still achieves maximum results.

The content quality remains stellar, but I don’t have to perpetually “stoke the fire” to keep things running smoothly.

In other words, my campaign requires less time (and stress), but everything still operates at a high level.

Here’s how to create a content marketing system that runs on autopilot.

Campaign structuring and organization

In my opinion, a well built campaign starts at the top and trickles down.

You need to keep chaos at bay by having a clear game plan and making sure that all of your team members are on the same page at all times.

How do you do this?

I recommend using an online collaborative content calendar.

Although your basic spreadsheet can be helpful, I’ve found it’s seldom sufficient to meet my needs.

However, an online collaborative content calendar allows you and your team to:

  • Systematically plan and coordinate your content
  • Make edits that can be viewed in real time
  • Keep track of deadlines
  • Monitor progress each step of the way from conception to completion

I also prefer this to a spreadsheet because of the visual element. I just find it easier to keep my ducks in a row when I can visually see what’s happening and what needs to get done.

image03

By staying organized, you can streamline collaboration, spend a lot less time scrambling to find information, and reduce your mistakes.

Some tools I recommend include CoSchedule, Buffer, and HubSpot.

Brainstorming

I’ve found that half of the battle of content marketing is simply coming up with new ideas for blog posts, white papers, videos, etc.

There never seems to be enough new ideas to “feed the hungry content monster.”

One way you can expedite the brainstorming process is to have a handful of idea-generating resources at your disposal.

I personally love BuzzSumo because it’s perfect for pointing me to articles on practically any topic under the sun.

Take content marketing for example.

By entering “content marketing” into the search bar, I instantly get access to a long list of articles written on this subject.

image01

As you can see, BuzzSumo also shows you how well each article has performed based on social shares so you can see which topics are clicking the most with readers.

Some other content aggregators and helpful resources I recommend include:

  • Feedly
  • Alltop
  • Quora

You may also want to create a spreadsheet of all relevant industry blogs that you can quickly reference when you need to brainstorm.

I actually wrote an article about how to never run out of ideas, which offers further insight on this topic. Check it out for more details.

Content creation

This is without a doubt the more laborious part of the content marketing process.

You’ve got to actually sit down and consistently pound out quality content. Or do you?

While I definitely write a lot of the content myself, there’s just no way to keep up with the demand while juggling everything else that’s involved with running a business.

That’s why I recommend outsourcing at least part of it to freelance writers.

In fact, “64 percent of B2B marketers outsource writing.”

Some may only outsource a small fraction of it, while others outsource nearly everything.

It really just depends on your budget and content needs.

If content marketing is your go-to marketing strategy (or writing just isn’t your forte), you’ll probably want to outsource a significant portion of your content creation.

I’ve found outsourcing to freelance writers to be a positive thing, and many other brands feel the same way.

In fact, a big reason for the success of KISSmetrics was skilled writers we hired.

I even wrote an article on how KISSmetrics grew to 793,858 visitors a month by using this formula.

However, you don’t want to leave your content and brand reputation to just anyone.

You need to be sure you hire writers who are highly skilled, understand your brand/style/tone, and create quality content that resonates with your audience.

That’s why you need to make sure a writer has these six skills before you hire them.

Content curation

This term is defined as “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme. The work involves sifting, sorting, arranging and publishing information.”

As you can tell, this sounds incredibly arduous. And it often is.

But it’s a staple of most content marketing campaigns.

Studies have even found that 95 percent of marketers share other organization’s content in some capacity.

image04

The problem is it’s like panning for gold. You have to sift through all the dirt and debris just to find something of value that you can share with your audience.

If you’re just blindly curating content without some type of a game plan, it’s going to be a massive time-drain.

image02

But the way I look at it, there are two main options to streamline this process:

  1. Hire someone else to do it
  2. Utilize a tool to make it quicker

The first choice is good because it can save time, but you lose a bit of control.

The second choice gives you maximum control and still saves time.

No matter what approach you choose, it’s still going to be much more efficient than manually sifting through piles of content just to find the diamond in the rough.

If you’re looking for a tool that works well for content curation, check out DrumUp.

It “analyzes tens of thousands of stories every day from across industries, interests and niches,” so you can quickly find great content to share.

Even if you’re in an extremely small niche, this will help you find suitable content for your audience without having to painstakingly search for a needle in a haystack.

Automating posting

The final piece of the puzzle is posting.

If you’ve only got one or two accounts, this is no big deal. You simply post your content manually and boom!—you’re done.

But what if you’re on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, and more?

Posting the same piece of content across multiple channels can quickly eat away at your time.

This is especially true if you’re posting nearly every day.

Fortunately, you can automate much of your content distribution by using a tool such as Zapier.

This easy-to-use platform connects your apps and allows you to post content across multiple channels with only a couple of clicks.

In turn, it can eliminate a lot of tedious busy work (while saving your sanity).

Conclusion

Creating an effective content marketing system involves addressing five key areas:

  1. Organizing and structuring your campaign
  2. Expediting the brainstorming process to come up with new ideas
  3. Creating the actual content
  4. Efficiently curating content
  5. Automating your posting

By taking measures to simplify and streamline these areas, you can create a system that essentially runs on autopilot.

This isn’t to say that it requires no effort or maintenance on your end whatsoever. But you can definitely eliminate a lot of the tasks and dramatically reduce the amount of time you spend on the tasks you still perform.

The outcome should be a content marketing system that produces equal or even greater results than the ones you’ve been achieving so far—while spending only a fraction of the time managing your campaign.

Are there any content marketing “hacks” that have worked for you?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/07/how-to-create-a-content-marketing-system-that-runs-on-autopilot/
via My Media Pal

How to Create a Content Marketing System That Runs on Autopilot

I think we can all agree that content marketing is both practical and potent.

It’s the ultimate form of inbound marketing and makes total sense when you need to reach 21st century consumers.

I could even spout off a laundry list of stats that prove just how big of an impact content marketing can have.

There’s the insane volume of leads, minimal financial investment, increased audience engagement, high ROI, and so on.

But if there’s any area where content marketers run into trouble, it’s the inherently time-consuming nature of the process.

Creating epic content takes time and energy. And not everyone has the time to devote to this marketing strategy.

And this doesn’t even include the additional effort needed to manage a campaign.

In many cases, it can take so much time that it hinders your ability to oversee other areas of business. Not good.

Here are some stats that put some perspective on just how time-consuming content marketing can be.

image00

If these trends continue, the time investment required for content marketing will keep growing and growing.

And of course you have to consider that competition levels will continue to rise as well.

With more brands catching wind of the potential of this technique, it will become increasingly difficult to make your campaign stand out from the masses, requiring even more of your time.

What’s the solution?

As a person who’s incredibly busy myself, I’ve figured out some effective ways to run a content marketing campaign that requires the least amount of time but still achieves maximum results.

The content quality remains stellar, but I don’t have to perpetually “stoke the fire” to keep things running smoothly.

In other words, my campaign requires less time (and stress), but everything still operates at a high level.

Here’s how to create a content marketing system that runs on autopilot.

Campaign structuring and organization

In my opinion, a well built campaign starts at the top and trickles down.

You need to keep chaos at bay by having a clear game plan and making sure that all of your team members are on the same page at all times.

How do you do this?

I recommend using an online collaborative content calendar.

Although your basic spreadsheet can be helpful, I’ve found it’s seldom sufficient to meet my needs.

However, an online collaborative content calendar allows you and your team to:

  • Systematically plan and coordinate your content
  • Make edits that can be viewed in real time
  • Keep track of deadlines
  • Monitor progress each step of the way from conception to completion

I also prefer this to a spreadsheet because of the visual element. I just find it easier to keep my ducks in a row when I can visually see what’s happening and what needs to get done.

image03

By staying organized, you can streamline collaboration, spend a lot less time scrambling to find information, and reduce your mistakes.

Some tools I recommend include CoSchedule, Buffer, and HubSpot.

Brainstorming

I’ve found that half of the battle of content marketing is simply coming up with new ideas for blog posts, white papers, videos, etc.

There never seems to be enough new ideas to “feed the hungry content monster.”

One way you can expedite the brainstorming process is to have a handful of idea-generating resources at your disposal.

I personally love BuzzSumo because it’s perfect for pointing me to articles on practically any topic under the sun.

Take content marketing for example.

By entering “content marketing” into the search bar, I instantly get access to a long list of articles written on this subject.

image01

As you can see, BuzzSumo also shows you how well each article has performed based on social shares so you can see which topics are clicking the most with readers.

Some other content aggregators and helpful resources I recommend include:

  • Feedly
  • Alltop
  • Quora

You may also want to create a spreadsheet of all relevant industry blogs that you can quickly reference when you need to brainstorm.

I actually wrote an article about how to never run out of ideas, which offers further insight on this topic. Check it out for more details.

Content creation

This is without a doubt the more laborious part of the content marketing process.

You’ve got to actually sit down and consistently pound out quality content. Or do you?

While I definitely write a lot of the content myself, there’s just no way to keep up with the demand while juggling everything else that’s involved with running a business.

That’s why I recommend outsourcing at least part of it to freelance writers.

In fact, “64 percent of B2B marketers outsource writing.”

Some may only outsource a small fraction of it, while others outsource nearly everything.

It really just depends on your budget and content needs.

If content marketing is your go-to marketing strategy (or writing just isn’t your forte), you’ll probably want to outsource a significant portion of your content creation.

I’ve found outsourcing to freelance writers to be a positive thing, and many other brands feel the same way.

In fact, a big reason for the success of KISSmetrics was skilled writers we hired.

I even wrote an article on how KISSmetrics grew to 793,858 visitors a month by using this formula.

However, you don’t want to leave your content and brand reputation to just anyone.

You need to be sure you hire writers who are highly skilled, understand your brand/style/tone, and create quality content that resonates with your audience.

That’s why you need to make sure a writer has these six skills before you hire them.

Content curation

This term is defined as “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme. The work involves sifting, sorting, arranging and publishing information.”

As you can tell, this sounds incredibly arduous. And it often is.

But it’s a staple of most content marketing campaigns.

Studies have even found that 95 percent of marketers share other organization’s content in some capacity.

image04

The problem is it’s like panning for gold. You have to sift through all the dirt and debris just to find something of value that you can share with your audience.

If you’re just blindly curating content without some type of a game plan, it’s going to be a massive time-drain.

image02

But the way I look at it, there are two main options to streamline this process:

  1. Hire someone else to do it
  2. Utilize a tool to make it quicker

The first choice is good because it can save time, but you lose a bit of control.

The second choice gives you maximum control and still saves time.

No matter what approach you choose, it’s still going to be much more efficient than manually sifting through piles of content just to find the diamond in the rough.

If you’re looking for a tool that works well for content curation, check out DrumUp.

It “analyzes tens of thousands of stories every day from across industries, interests and niches,” so you can quickly find great content to share.

Even if you’re in an extremely small niche, this will help you find suitable content for your audience without having to painstakingly search for a needle in a haystack.

Automating posting

The final piece of the puzzle is posting.

If you’ve only got one or two accounts, this is no big deal. You simply post your content manually and boom!—you’re done.

But what if you’re on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, and more?

Posting the same piece of content across multiple channels can quickly eat away at your time.

This is especially true if you’re posting nearly every day.

Fortunately, you can automate much of your content distribution by using a tool such as Zapier.

This easy-to-use platform connects your apps and allows you to post content across multiple channels with only a couple of clicks.

In turn, it can eliminate a lot of tedious busy work (while saving your sanity).

Conclusion

Creating an effective content marketing system involves addressing five key areas:

  1. Organizing and structuring your campaign
  2. Expediting the brainstorming process to come up with new ideas
  3. Creating the actual content
  4. Efficiently curating content
  5. Automating your posting

By taking measures to simplify and streamline these areas, you can create a system that essentially runs on autopilot.

This isn’t to say that it requires no effort or maintenance on your end whatsoever. But you can definitely eliminate a lot of the tasks and dramatically reduce the amount of time you spend on the tasks you still perform.

The outcome should be a content marketing system that produces equal or even greater results than the ones you’ve been achieving so far—while spending only a fraction of the time managing your campaign.

Are there any content marketing “hacks” that have worked for you?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/07/how-to-create-a-content-marketing-system-that-runs-on-autopilot/
via My Media Pal

How to Create a Content Marketing System That Runs on Autopilot

I think we can all agree that content marketing is both practical and potent.

It’s the ultimate form of inbound marketing and makes total sense when you need to reach 21st century consumers.

I could even spout off a laundry list of stats that prove just how big of an impact content marketing can have.

There’s the insane volume of leads, minimal financial investment, increased audience engagement, high ROI, and so on.

But if there’s any area where content marketers run into trouble, it’s the inherently time-consuming nature of the process.

Creating epic content takes time and energy. And not everyone has the time to devote to this marketing strategy.

And this doesn’t even include the additional effort needed to manage a campaign.

In many cases, it can take so much time that it hinders your ability to oversee other areas of business. Not good.

Here are some stats that put some perspective on just how time-consuming content marketing can be.

image00

If these trends continue, the time investment required for content marketing will keep growing and growing.

And of course you have to consider that competition levels will continue to rise as well.

With more brands catching wind of the potential of this technique, it will become increasingly difficult to make your campaign stand out from the masses, requiring even more of your time.

What’s the solution?

As a person who’s incredibly busy myself, I’ve figured out some effective ways to run a content marketing campaign that requires the least amount of time but still achieves maximum results.

The content quality remains stellar, but I don’t have to perpetually “stoke the fire” to keep things running smoothly.

In other words, my campaign requires less time (and stress), but everything still operates at a high level.

Here’s how to create a content marketing system that runs on autopilot.

Campaign structuring and organization

In my opinion, a well built campaign starts at the top and trickles down.

You need to keep chaos at bay by having a clear game plan and making sure that all of your team members are on the same page at all times.

How do you do this?

I recommend using an online collaborative content calendar.

Although your basic spreadsheet can be helpful, I’ve found it’s seldom sufficient to meet my needs.

However, an online collaborative content calendar allows you and your team to:

  • Systematically plan and coordinate your content
  • Make edits that can be viewed in real time
  • Keep track of deadlines
  • Monitor progress each step of the way from conception to completion

I also prefer this to a spreadsheet because of the visual element. I just find it easier to keep my ducks in a row when I can visually see what’s happening and what needs to get done.

image03

By staying organized, you can streamline collaboration, spend a lot less time scrambling to find information, and reduce your mistakes.

Some tools I recommend include CoSchedule, Buffer, and HubSpot.

Brainstorming

I’ve found that half of the battle of content marketing is simply coming up with new ideas for blog posts, white papers, videos, etc.

There never seems to be enough new ideas to “feed the hungry content monster.”

One way you can expedite the brainstorming process is to have a handful of idea-generating resources at your disposal.

I personally love BuzzSumo because it’s perfect for pointing me to articles on practically any topic under the sun.

Take content marketing for example.

By entering “content marketing” into the search bar, I instantly get access to a long list of articles written on this subject.

image01

As you can see, BuzzSumo also shows you how well each article has performed based on social shares so you can see which topics are clicking the most with readers.

Some other content aggregators and helpful resources I recommend include:

  • Feedly
  • Alltop
  • Quora

You may also want to create a spreadsheet of all relevant industry blogs that you can quickly reference when you need to brainstorm.

I actually wrote an article about how to never run out of ideas, which offers further insight on this topic. Check it out for more details.

Content creation

This is without a doubt the more laborious part of the content marketing process.

You’ve got to actually sit down and consistently pound out quality content. Or do you?

While I definitely write a lot of the content myself, there’s just no way to keep up with the demand while juggling everything else that’s involved with running a business.

That’s why I recommend outsourcing at least part of it to freelance writers.

In fact, “64 percent of B2B marketers outsource writing.”

Some may only outsource a small fraction of it, while others outsource nearly everything.

It really just depends on your budget and content needs.

If content marketing is your go-to marketing strategy (or writing just isn’t your forte), you’ll probably want to outsource a significant portion of your content creation.

I’ve found outsourcing to freelance writers to be a positive thing, and many other brands feel the same way.

In fact, a big reason for the success of KISSmetrics was skilled writers we hired.

I even wrote an article on how KISSmetrics grew to 793,858 visitors a month by using this formula.

However, you don’t want to leave your content and brand reputation to just anyone.

You need to be sure you hire writers who are highly skilled, understand your brand/style/tone, and create quality content that resonates with your audience.

That’s why you need to make sure a writer has these six skills before you hire them.

Content curation

This term is defined as “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme. The work involves sifting, sorting, arranging and publishing information.”

As you can tell, this sounds incredibly arduous. And it often is.

But it’s a staple of most content marketing campaigns.

Studies have even found that 95 percent of marketers share other organization’s content in some capacity.

image04

The problem is it’s like panning for gold. You have to sift through all the dirt and debris just to find something of value that you can share with your audience.

If you’re just blindly curating content without some type of a game plan, it’s going to be a massive time-drain.

image02

But the way I look at it, there are two main options to streamline this process:

  1. Hire someone else to do it
  2. Utilize a tool to make it quicker

The first choice is good because it can save time, but you lose a bit of control.

The second choice gives you maximum control and still saves time.

No matter what approach you choose, it’s still going to be much more efficient than manually sifting through piles of content just to find the diamond in the rough.

If you’re looking for a tool that works well for content curation, check out DrumUp.

It “analyzes tens of thousands of stories every day from across industries, interests and niches,” so you can quickly find great content to share.

Even if you’re in an extremely small niche, this will help you find suitable content for your audience without having to painstakingly search for a needle in a haystack.

Automating posting

The final piece of the puzzle is posting.

If you’ve only got one or two accounts, this is no big deal. You simply post your content manually and boom!—you’re done.

But what if you’re on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, and more?

Posting the same piece of content across multiple channels can quickly eat away at your time.

This is especially true if you’re posting nearly every day.

Fortunately, you can automate much of your content distribution by using a tool such as Zapier.

This easy-to-use platform connects your apps and allows you to post content across multiple channels with only a couple of clicks.

In turn, it can eliminate a lot of tedious busy work (while saving your sanity).

Conclusion

Creating an effective content marketing system involves addressing five key areas:

  1. Organizing and structuring your campaign
  2. Expediting the brainstorming process to come up with new ideas
  3. Creating the actual content
  4. Efficiently curating content
  5. Automating your posting

By taking measures to simplify and streamline these areas, you can create a system that essentially runs on autopilot.

This isn’t to say that it requires no effort or maintenance on your end whatsoever. But you can definitely eliminate a lot of the tasks and dramatically reduce the amount of time you spend on the tasks you still perform.

The outcome should be a content marketing system that produces equal or even greater results than the ones you’ve been achieving so far—while spending only a fraction of the time managing your campaign.

Are there any content marketing “hacks” that have worked for you?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/07/how-to-create-a-content-marketing-system-that-runs-on-autopilot/
via My Media Pal

What Effect Does Swearing Have on Your Brand?

Disclaimer: Please refrain from reading this post if you’re easily offended or have no sense of humor whatsoever.

It’s noisy and saturated these days in the marketing realm.

Brands are in a never-ending battle of one-upmanship.

With many industries being hyper-competitive and increasingly saturated, it’s never been more difficult to stand out from the pack.

But one technique that seems to work (at least for the brands that do it right) is swearing.

Some notable companies that have pulled this off flawlessly include Thug Kitchen, Vinomofo, and Dollar Shave Club.

It’s also something I have experimented with in the past.

In this post, I’d like to talk about the pros and cons of this brand strategy and whether or not you should try it.

I’ll draw from my own experience and use some actual examples to help you decide whether this is a viable technique for your brand.

Keep in mind that there will be some swearing, so only keep reading if you’re cool with that.

Why would you want to swear in your marketing?

It’s important to first say that swearing isn’t the right move for many brands.

For example, if you’re selling children’s toys, this approach obviously isn’t in the cards for you. If you use it, it’s just going to hurt your reputation.

But if you’re catering to a certain demographic (e.g., snarky twenty-somethings), this can most definitely work to your advantage.

Why would it make sense to drop a few f-bombs?

The way I look at it, there are four main reasons why you would want to swear.

1. It’s funny

If your audience is fairly lax—not too uptight or rigid—there’s a good chance a percentage of them will respond favorably to swearing. It’ll look humorous to them.

It’s kind of like conjuring your inner Beavis and Butthead who can’t help but find potty humor and cursing funny.

I think the funny factor is heightened even more when it catches you off guard and you hear someone like an old lady or a little girl swearing.

Take Potty-Mouthed Princesses, for example.

In a campaign from FCKH8.com, seemingly innocent little girls dressed as princesses drop f-bombs for feminism:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/109731596?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0

(Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com from FCKH8.com on Vimeo.)

It definitely takes you by surprise, and you can’t help but laugh when you hear little girls swearing like sailors.

2. It conveys authenticity

When you think about all the overly corporate, polished brands out there that are meticulous about keeping a spotless reputation, it’s refreshing to see a brand that lets loose a little.

When I see a brand swearing, I feel like they’re “keeping it real” and know how to have fun. It shows that a company knows what it’s all about and isn’t afraid to run with it.

3. It conveys confidence

Swearing is a ballsy marketing move. It’s not for the timid.

It shows you’re not afraid to be a little rebellious and break conventional marketing rules. Some notable personalities have built their entire identity on a salty word.

image03

Is it offensive? Maybe. Depends on who you are.

Is it confident? Heck, yes.

I think a few well-placed curse words also show that a brand has the cojones to rock the ship, which is appealing to many customers.

4. It helps you connect on a deeper level with your audience

It’s fair to say that “rocking the ship” by swearing won’t allow you to appeal to as wide of a demographic as it would if you kept your marketing squeaky clean.

But who cares?

Using this approach shows you really know your audience and aren’t trying to be everything to everyone.

Or as Tyler Durden from Fight Club would say,

You gotta crack a few eggs to make an omelet.

What are the potential repercussions?

Of course, it might not be all puppy dogs and rainbows if you incorporate swearing into your marketing. There can be some drawbacks.

After all, being controversial isn’t everyone’s cup of tea.

I actually wrote a blog post about a small experiment I conducted to see how my email subscribers would respond to me sending them an email with a controversial title.

Here’s what I found:

  • I was hoping that the open rate would increase, but it stayed the same (roughly 26%).
  • It received more traffic than most other posts. It even got an extra 4,061 visitors compared to a normal Monday blog post, and my social media traffic was 134% more than normal.
  • It hurt my revenue. Compared to a normal Monday, the income dropped by 26%. The income for that day was even lower than for the days when I don’t published a blog post by roughly 4%.

This means that swearing isn’t necessarily a smart move for your brand.

You may come across as crass, unsophisticated, and even uneducated.

In fact, it can potentially sour your existing relationships, make you lose customers, and hurt your overall profitability.

This is why I don’t recommend jumping in head first with swearing. You’ll want to know the full scope of this marketing move and the potential implications before you start swearing like a sailor.

What I’m trying to say is that like with most things, there are inherent pros and cons to swearing.

It’s definitely not for every brand, but it works well for some.

Examples of brands that use swearing

I’d like to point out three specific brands that I feel have used swearing to their advantage.

They’re all a little edgy and known for being cynical and snarky. They’re also quite witty.

Example 1 – Thug Kitchen

In my opinion, this brand really pushes the envelope. Just look at what visitors see after landing on its homepage:

image02

Keep in mind that this is above the fold for the whole world to see. It’s not hidden on some obscure page of the site. It’s in your face and right to the point.

Not many brands would have the courage to take this approach.

Call them obscene. Call them dangerous. Call them crass, but I feel that Thug Kitchen pulls it off eloquently.

Just take a look at one of its blog posts:

image04

Or check out the Thug Kitchen Cookbook trailer:

For a second, you think this is just another commercial like the thousands of other super-PC, mind-numbing commercials out there.

But it quickly becomes evident that this is very, very different. Thug Kitchen uses its wit and smartassery to make an incredibly (in my opinion) funny spoof commercial.

The team does it seamlessly and with a great entertainment factor.

Example 2 – Vinomofo

This company specializes in selling “epic wines” to wine enthusiasts around the world.

Their brand identity puts an emphasis on being authentic and unpretentious.

And while they’re nowhere near as hardcore as Thug Kitchen is with their swearing, Vinomofo is definitely edgy.

Here’s a short snippet from the “About” section of their site that describes the “Mofo Tribe”:

image00

It’s pretty clear they’ve got a firm grasp of their demographic.

It’s also clear they’re not worried about catering to everyone. They “get it” and are just looking to connect with their tight little audience.

Example 3 – Dollar Shave Club

image01

Pretty much everyone has heard of Dollar Shave Club by now.

That’s founder Michael Dubin being saucy and sarcastic about how awesome his company’s razor blades are.

There’s no beating around the bush, and Dollar Shave Club’s distinct brand of humor has been the primary reason for their success and net worth of $615 million.

In my opinion, they’re marketing geniuses who have found a way to pepper in a little swearing to enhance their brand identity.

Conclusion

Here’s the deal: Under the right circumstances, swearing and even flat-out obscenity can work wonders.

Aaaand, here’s my disclaimer: Under the wrong circumstances, it can offend consumers, diminish your brand equity, and make you look like an insensitive bigot.

It’s really amazing how far-ranging the results can be.

Although I’ve found swearing to have more of a negative than positive impact on my brand, this doesn’t mean it can’t work for you.

Just look at the success that companies like Thug Kitchen, Vinomofo, and especially Dollar Shave Club have had.

Or think about famous people such as comedian George Carlin and author Chuck Palahniuk, whose names have become synonymous with being edgy and non-PC.

My advice is this: consider your audience, and ask these questions:

  • Does your target audience primarily consist of people who would be okay with swearing?
  • Or would it turn them off and detract from their experience?
  • Also, does swearing align with the overall brand identity you’re trying to establish?

If you feel like swearing could be used to your advantage, you might want to experiment with it.

I wouldn’t go to the extremes of Thug Kitchen and start dropping f-bombs left and right. But you could throw in a curse word or two to see how your audience reacts.

I also recommend that you avoid being blatantly offensive. Be mature. Keep it classy, and try not to alienate your audience in the process.

What’s your opinion of brands that use swearing?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/05/what-effect-does-swearing-have-on-your-brand/
via My Media Pal

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

You know the saying “content is king,” right?

Well, there’s a new king in town, and its name is longform content.

Like you, I was skeptical about longform content at first. “Nobody wants to read 4,000 words,” I thought.

I was dead wrong.

Because longform content rocks. It seems intimidating at first, but the benefits are insane.

Need proof? Back in 2012, I ran an A/B test on my site Crazy Egg. I tested the regular homepage against a shorter version. And the longer version converted 30% higher than the short version.

image02

Longform worked better in 2012, and it still works better today.

Need more proof? Longform blog posts get more social shares and have a higher average Google rank.

Convinced? Awesome! Now onto the good stuff—creating the content that converts.

For most of us, creating the content is usually the hard part. If you’re used to writing 400-word blog posts, writing 4,000+ seems impossible. But it’s totally possible. And I’ll show you how.

Look no further: This is the ultimate blueprint to creating a high-converting longform blog post.

1. Know your audience

You will get absolutely nowhere if you don’t consider your audience first and foremost.

It seems obvious, right? But many bloggers get this wrong. They post irrelevant content and then scratch their heads, wondering why the content didn’t do well.

Even if you put out awesome content, it’ll be worthless if your readers don’t love it. You need to find out what your readers want and make it happen.

But how do you get the scoop on your readers?

One of the best ways to get to know your readers is by surveying them. You can send out a mass survey or schedule calls with a few readers to find out exactly what your audience wants.

Next, check out your comments section. Read through each comment, and really listen to what your readers have to say. You’ll likely find that certain types of posts tend to have more comments.

And don’t forget to check your social metrics. Which articles have been shared or retweeted?

Last but not least, I’ll share one of my favorite tools for getting into your readers’ minds: Google Analytics.

image04

Google Analytics (GA) can reveal a lot about your readers. You can find out where your readers are from and what their interests are. Every blogger needs to know and use GA.

2. Choose relevant ideas

Once you’ve understood your readers’ needs, you have to meet those needs with your content. And that means coming up with relevant ideas.

Here’s the catch: Coming up with ideas is hard. You want something fresh that will excite your readers, but it’s all been done before, right?

Don’t worry—it’s easier than it seems.

First, take a look at the data you’ve collected from your readers. What kinds of topics are most popular with them? That’s the ballpark you want to be in.

Let’s say you have a fitness blog and you see that articles about food get the most attention. That’s your starting point. From there, you can narrow it down.

For example, if GA Interests tells you that your readers are interested in apartment living, you might write an article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors.” You’re delivering exactly what your readers want.

But there are tons of ways to get ideas. One time-tested trick is to use BuzzSumo to find trending articles. Let’s apply that to our example of apartment workouts:

image08

Now you’ve got some insight into what your competitors are doing and what’s working for them.

3. Make the content crazy good

You knew going into this that the actual content of your blog posts is important.

And when you’re dealing with longform posts, the quality of the content will make or break the experience.

If you can’t hook your readers and keep them interested, you’ll lose them because no one’s going to read thousands of words if the content is boring them to tears.

How do you keep your readers entertained that long?

There’s one trick to this: Strive to provide enormous value with every word you write.

If you’re constantly aiming at providing value, your writing will be more targeted. And that’s always a good thing.

(It also wouldn’t hurt to brush up on your copywriting skills.)

I’ll be the first to admit that you can focus on providing value and still struggle with writing great content.

Thankfully, there are other techniques you can use:

Aim to use short paragraphs, subheadings, and lots of images. This will help readers move through the post more quickly, increasing the likelihood that they’ll finish reading.

Check out this post from Buffer:

image05

Subheadings are particularly important for longform content. If your readers are scrolling through your post and see paragraph after paragraph after paragraph, they’ll get tired. Fast.

Make sure your readers always know where they are in your post. Use subheadings as mile markers to remind your readers of the topic at hand.

And you absolutely have to include research. Your readers want to be sure that what you’re saying is backed by data. Posts that include real-life examples and case studies perform better than data-free posts.

Don’t skip over this step! Your article content plays a crucial role in conversion. If your content doesn’t wow people, do you think they’ll want to give you their emails? (Spoiler alert: they won’t.)

4. Offer something special

If you’ve written a spectacular longform blog post, you’ll hook your readers. But it doesn’t end there: you have to give them somewhere to go next.

Don’t get me wrong—there’s a ton of longform content that performs extremely well without offering anything. (Quick Sprout’s Advanced Guide to Content Marketing is just one example.)

But we’re talking about writing high-converting longform blog posts. And while you can get good conversion rates without offering a gift, they won’t be as good.

Think about it. Your first-time readers just finished your 3,000-word post. They loved it, and they want more. If they see a free offer from you, you can bet they’ll take it.

That’s because once you’ve built up authority with your audience, you’re in the position to offer a trade: something extremely valuable for nothing more than an email address. It’s a win-win.

This technique—giving away something on a blog post—is called a content upgrade. Your offer raises the bar and gives readers something even better than the blog post itself.

Brian Dean from Backlinko is a huge fan of content upgrades. In fact, he was one of the pioneers of the content upgrade approach.

He even uses a content upgrade on his post about content upgrades:

image00

See what he’s doing? He’s offering his readers something valuable that builds on the information in the blog post. In this case, it’s a checklist.

When Brian implemented content upgrades, he got an unbelievable 785% in conversions. (Nope, that’s not a typo.)

That’s the power of the content upgrade.

But you need to create the perfect content upgrade. It needs to be relevant, valuable, and helpful.

This is where all that data we talked about earlier comes in. Remember that apartment workout example we used? Our hypothetical fitness blog has readers who are also interested in apartment living (according to GA).

Content upgrades let you go a step further. An article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors” is good, but offering a bonus infographic showing the five workouts, step by step, is even better.

Here’s another great example from Bryan Harris at Videofruit. I love this content upgrade because it’s so relevant.

Here’s the article:

image06

It’s already valuable, but then Bryan ends the article with this:

image03

Are you kidding me? Templates and source code? That’s a one-two punch that creates a humongous amount of additional value.

As you can see, content upgrades work best when they’re super relevant to the topic at hand. Give your readers actionable advice they can use today.

5. Share it

I see that sometimes people focus on the “content” part of content marketing too much.

But your awesome blog post won’t do anything if it’s sitting on your site collecting dust. It needs to be shared.

The first step is to promote the article on all your social networks. (Here are some of my favorite tools for getting more social shares.)

But you don’t have to stop there. You can find influencers in your niche and reach out to them with your article.

A popular method of reaching out to blogs is to find broken links, alert the blog owners, and nicely ask them to share your article. Brian Dean calls this the “Moving Man Method.”

This worked extremely well for Backlinko reader Richard Marriot, who saw a 348% traffic increase in a week. He sent out emails like this:

image01

And this was the result:

image07

This isn’t hot air—this is stuff that works for real people. And it’ll work for you too.

Conclusion

If you do it right, longform blog posts can become one of the highest converting parts of your site.

But that requires paying serious attention to it. You can’t stop blogging, and you can’t let the quality of your posts go down.

That said, if you put in the work, you’ll see your conversion rates soar. I know that because that’s what happened to me and tons of other bloggers.

People love longform content when it’s super valuable to them.

So, go out there and create longform blog posts that will blow your readers away.

What are your favorite tricks for creating awesome longform blog posts?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post/
via My Media Pal

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

You know the saying “content is king,” right?

Well, there’s a new king in town, and its name is longform content.

Like you, I was skeptical about longform content at first. “Nobody wants to read 4,000 words,” I thought.

I was dead wrong.

Because longform content rocks. It seems intimidating at first, but the benefits are insane.

Need proof? Back in 2012, I ran an A/B test on my site Crazy Egg. I tested the regular homepage against a shorter version. And the longer version converted 30% higher than the short version.

image02

Longform worked better in 2012, and it still works better today.

Need more proof? Longform blog posts get more social shares and have a higher average Google rank.

Convinced? Awesome! Now onto the good stuff—creating the content that converts.

For most of us, creating the content is usually the hard part. If you’re used to writing 400-word blog posts, writing 4,000+ seems impossible. But it’s totally possible. And I’ll show you how.

Look no further: This is the ultimate blueprint to creating a high-converting longform blog post.

1. Know your audience

You will get absolutely nowhere if you don’t consider your audience first and foremost.

It seems obvious, right? But many bloggers get this wrong. They post irrelevant content and then scratch their heads, wondering why the content didn’t do well.

Even if you put out awesome content, it’ll be worthless if your readers don’t love it. You need to find out what your readers want and make it happen.

But how do you get the scoop on your readers?

One of the best ways to get to know your readers is by surveying them. You can send out a mass survey or schedule calls with a few readers to find out exactly what your audience wants.

Next, check out your comments section. Read through each comment, and really listen to what your readers have to say. You’ll likely find that certain types of posts tend to have more comments.

And don’t forget to check your social metrics. Which articles have been shared or retweeted?

Last but not least, I’ll share one of my favorite tools for getting into your readers’ minds: Google Analytics.

image04

Google Analytics (GA) can reveal a lot about your readers. You can find out where your readers are from and what their interests are. Every blogger needs to know and use GA.

2. Choose relevant ideas

Once you’ve understood your readers’ needs, you have to meet those needs with your content. And that means coming up with relevant ideas.

Here’s the catch: Coming up with ideas is hard. You want something fresh that will excite your readers, but it’s all been done before, right?

Don’t worry—it’s easier than it seems.

First, take a look at the data you’ve collected from your readers. What kinds of topics are most popular with them? That’s the ballpark you want to be in.

Let’s say you have a fitness blog and you see that articles about food get the most attention. That’s your starting point. From there, you can narrow it down.

For example, if GA Interests tells you that your readers are interested in apartment living, you might write an article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors.” You’re delivering exactly what your readers want.

But there are tons of ways to get ideas. One time-tested trick is to use BuzzSumo to find trending articles. Let’s apply that to our example of apartment workouts:

image08

Now you’ve got some insight into what your competitors are doing and what’s working for them.

3. Make the content crazy good

You knew going into this that the actual content of your blog posts is important.

And when you’re dealing with longform posts, the quality of the content will make or break the experience.

If you can’t hook your readers and keep them interested, you’ll lose them because no one’s going to read thousands of words if the content is boring them to tears.

How do you keep your readers entertained that long?

There’s one trick to this: Strive to provide enormous value with every word you write.

If you’re constantly aiming at providing value, your writing will be more targeted. And that’s always a good thing.

(It also wouldn’t hurt to brush up on your copywriting skills.)

I’ll be the first to admit that you can focus on providing value and still struggle with writing great content.

Thankfully, there are other techniques you can use:

Aim to use short paragraphs, subheadings, and lots of images. This will help readers move through the post more quickly, increasing the likelihood that they’ll finish reading.

Check out this post from Buffer:

image05

Subheadings are particularly important for longform content. If your readers are scrolling through your post and see paragraph after paragraph after paragraph, they’ll get tired. Fast.

Make sure your readers always know where they are in your post. Use subheadings as mile markers to remind your readers of the topic at hand.

And you absolutely have to include research. Your readers want to be sure that what you’re saying is backed by data. Posts that include real-life examples and case studies perform better than data-free posts.

Don’t skip over this step! Your article content plays a crucial role in conversion. If your content doesn’t wow people, do you think they’ll want to give you their emails? (Spoiler alert: they won’t.)

4. Offer something special

If you’ve written a spectacular longform blog post, you’ll hook your readers. But it doesn’t end there: you have to give them somewhere to go next.

Don’t get me wrong—there’s a ton of longform content that performs extremely well without offering anything. (Quick Sprout’s Advanced Guide to Content Marketing is just one example.)

But we’re talking about writing high-converting longform blog posts. And while you can get good conversion rates without offering a gift, they won’t be as good.

Think about it. Your first-time readers just finished your 3,000-word post. They loved it, and they want more. If they see a free offer from you, you can bet they’ll take it.

That’s because once you’ve built up authority with your audience, you’re in the position to offer a trade: something extremely valuable for nothing more than an email address. It’s a win-win.

This technique—giving away something on a blog post—is called a content upgrade. Your offer raises the bar and gives readers something even better than the blog post itself.

Brian Dean from Backlinko is a huge fan of content upgrades. In fact, he was one of the pioneers of the content upgrade approach.

He even uses a content upgrade on his post about content upgrades:

image00

See what he’s doing? He’s offering his readers something valuable that builds on the information in the blog post. In this case, it’s a checklist.

When Brian implemented content upgrades, he got an unbelievable 785% in conversions. (Nope, that’s not a typo.)

That’s the power of the content upgrade.

But you need to create the perfect content upgrade. It needs to be relevant, valuable, and helpful.

This is where all that data we talked about earlier comes in. Remember that apartment workout example we used? Our hypothetical fitness blog has readers who are also interested in apartment living (according to GA).

Content upgrades let you go a step further. An article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors” is good, but offering a bonus infographic showing the five workouts, step by step, is even better.

Here’s another great example from Bryan Harris at Videofruit. I love this content upgrade because it’s so relevant.

Here’s the article:

image06

It’s already valuable, but then Bryan ends the article with this:

image03

Are you kidding me? Templates and source code? That’s a one-two punch that creates a humongous amount of additional value.

As you can see, content upgrades work best when they’re super relevant to the topic at hand. Give your readers actionable advice they can use today.

5. Share it

I see that sometimes people focus on the “content” part of content marketing too much.

But your awesome blog post won’t do anything if it’s sitting on your site collecting dust. It needs to be shared.

The first step is to promote the article on all your social networks. (Here are some of my favorite tools for getting more social shares.)

But you don’t have to stop there. You can find influencers in your niche and reach out to them with your article.

A popular method of reaching out to blogs is to find broken links, alert the blog owners, and nicely ask them to share your article. Brian Dean calls this the “Moving Man Method.”

This worked extremely well for Backlinko reader Richard Marriot, who saw a 348% traffic increase in a week. He sent out emails like this:

image01

And this was the result:

image07

This isn’t hot air—this is stuff that works for real people. And it’ll work for you too.

Conclusion

If you do it right, longform blog posts can become one of the highest converting parts of your site.

But that requires paying serious attention to it. You can’t stop blogging, and you can’t let the quality of your posts go down.

That said, if you put in the work, you’ll see your conversion rates soar. I know that because that’s what happened to me and tons of other bloggers.

People love longform content when it’s super valuable to them.

So, go out there and create longform blog posts that will blow your readers away.

What are your favorite tricks for creating awesome longform blog posts?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post/
via My Media Pal